Home Forums Health, Fitness & Beauty Assisted suicide.

This topic contains 16 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  Dom 1 week, 2 days ago.

Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #485834

    Radon
    Participant
    • Topics: 12
    • Replies: 224
    • Contributions: 236
    • Scout
    • ★★★

    Member since
    19th April 2019

    Saw a feature on BBC Morning News today about assisted suicide. Cannot guarantee getting it totally right but it went something like:-

    A short beginning said that in the UK it is illegal to help someone to commit suicide. Even just contacting DIGNITAS the assisted suicide company on behalf of someone in such a dire health state that they want to end their life will finish up with you in the dock if the person dying finishes up at DIGNITAS in Switzerland or gets guidance and commits suicide. Even just looking up airline times for them is enough to fall foul of the law.

    It continued with a real life event where an 80 year old woman comitted suicide because she was in nonstop pain from Stage 4 bone cancer. Even though her daughter was at work when she took her own life the daughter was put under investigation by the police. Not only that but the dead woman’s son was treated just the same by the police. Only after a year when a coroner found her death as unassisted suicide were they “cleared”.

    They then had on a Doctor who said fatuous things about suicide always being wrong. He was so (to me) out of touch that I was shouting at the TV saying I hoped that he would die from something really painful.

    I cannot see assisted suicide being allowed by Parliament, more is the pity.

    I have a friend whose wife has died of a brain tumour. He has obtained enough “pills” to finish himself off if he has anything similar but wisely has not informed either his son or daughter.

    Surprisingly, I have also thought about going down the same route if things, medically, get really bad.

    Any thoughts on this subject out there?

    1+
    #485897

    Michael
    Participant
    • Topics: 9
    • Replies: 192
    • Contributions: 201
    • Scout
    • ★★★

    Member since
    23rd July 2016

    Full agreement. It should be a basic human right that people can end their life at a time of their own choosing when confronted by a terminal condition involving the loss of quality of life. For these doctors to say they have the ability to monitor and manage someones pain in these situations is ridiculous.

    1+
    #485898

    john
    Participant
    • Topics: 6
    • Replies: 157
    • Contributions: 163
    • Scout
    • ★★★

    Member since
    7th January 2018

    Totally agree 100% with you Michael.

    I feel that when I cant keep myself clean toilet wise and just watch tv & sleep all day then I would like to choose when I die.

    I have thought about this many times even though I am a fit and healthy 60 year old , but would like to call it a day when I feel the time is right with a good quality and very chilled Coffret kalashnikov Red Army Vodka + a cafe creme cigar listening to Vaughan Williams: the lark ascending sat out side as the sun goes down in Brittany with the help from some Pill.

    WHY should I have to possibly live in misery / pain / and sat in messed trousers waiting for some poor underpaid soul to clean me up ?

    3+
    #485903

    Fruitcake
    Participant
    • Topics: 110
    • Replies: 5263
    • Contributions: 5373
    • Mega Star
    • ★★★★★★★★

    Member since
    13th July 2018

    In principle I agree, with the proviso that the person concerned is judged to be of ‘sound mind’ and capable of making such a decision.

    1+
    #485924

    officer crabtree
    Participant
    • Topics: 4
    • Replies: 345
    • Contributions: 349
    • Chief
    • ★★★★

    Member since
    23rd March 2016

    Then it goes from being a right to being a duty Read Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

     

    However I agree that as long a judicial safeguards are in place  I personally would not have a problem I mean if we let an animal suffer in the same way that some humans are forced to suffer we would be on a charge And I have no doubt that many years ago some of my relatives with terminal cancer were eased out of this world by our kindly humane GP but then of course along comes Harold Shipman….

    1+
    #486154

    Blue velvet
    Participant
    • Topics: 218
    • Replies: 16336
    • Contributions: 16554
    • Mega Star
    • ★★★★★★★★

    Member since
    19th March 2016

    How do you judge if someone is of sound mind then? When I see perfectly attractive females having all sorts done to their faces or body bits !  I feel it’s my body and if that’s how I feel in the future that’s it, if life becomes too awful to continue, but it also invalidates your life insurance, ( I have’nt  any!) so beware . But I don’t want to end up dribbling into my wine either! :whistle:

     

    1+
    #486161

    Fruitcake
    Participant
    • Topics: 110
    • Replies: 5263
    • Contributions: 5373
    • Mega Star
    • ★★★★★★★★

    Member since
    13th July 2018

    I agree Blue, but having a friend with dementia it was that sort of thing I was thinking of when I said ‘being of sound mind’ bless him he cannot even decide if he should wear one or four pairs of socks and often ends up with the four, which is why I said “In principle” Of course we should be able to state our wishes in writing of such an outcome before we ever get to such a stage in our life but, as you rightly said, we should be aware of the impact on insurances.

    0
    #486167

    Blue velvet
    Participant
    • Topics: 218
    • Replies: 16336
    • Contributions: 16554
    • Mega Star
    • ★★★★★★★★

    Member since
    19th March 2016

    I understand perfectly Fruitcake a very close relative too. :rose:

    0
    #486244

    tournesol
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 647
    • Contributions: 650
    • Star
    • ★★★★★★

    Member since
    13th April 2016

    It is a very difficult subject, but it is hard to believe there is still no legislation. In the 21st century, it remains that we do not have the freedom to choose. Whilst still mentally able, I would like to plan for a humane ending legally, if it should become necessary.

    As it stands, for those that are suffering, there’s the prospect of having to commit suicide while still being physically capable, with the pressure of having to anticipate exactly when on the verge of terminal incapacity, possibly being robbed of a little bit more life. Or, family stepping in, incredibly difficult and risking prosecution.

    So wrong, we do it for animals.

    1+
    #486285

    Jean Matthews
    Participant
    • Topics: 26
    • Replies: 318
    • Contributions: 344
    • Chief
    • ★★★★

    Member since
    20th March 2016

    My Mum passed away at the end of may , she had very bad dementia,  no mobility, no speech, doubly incontinent,  and slept most of the time if she knew how she was she would have been mortified. I wouldn’t have wanted her to suffer the indignity of being how she was but there is nothing one can do.  The home were lovely to her right till the end. But I will admit it was a blessing and a relief when she passed.

    0
    #486291

    Vegemite Kid
    Moderator
    • Topics: 321
    • Replies: 6794
    • Contributions: 7115
    • Mega Star
    • ★★★★★★★★

    Member since
    18th March 2016

    My Mum passed away at the end of may , she had very bad dementia, no mobility, no speech, doubly incontinent, and slept most of the time if she knew how she was she would have been mortified. I wouldn’t have wanted her to suffer the indignity of being how she was but there is nothing one can do. The home were lovely to her right till the end. But I will admit it was a blessing and a relief when she passed.

    Jean, if in a moment of clarity, before full dementia set in, she had asked you to help her end things, would you have tried? I can’t imagine any court, if someone was found guilty, finding it appropriate to imprison the assister, given all the circumstances.

    0
    #486306

    Pete James
    Participant
    • Topics: 57
    • Replies: 6181
    • Contributions: 6238
    • Mega Star
    • ★★★★★★★★

    Member since
    22nd July 2016

    My late missus passed away in 2012. In 1998 she became physically handicapped following a domestic accident (she fell down the stairs whilst sleepwalking !)  and spent lots of the time in a wheelchair when it was too painful to walk with her sticks. In 2005 cancer was revealed which increased her misery. She already had the pain from the handicap and the pain and misery from the chemo, operations and other treatments must have been unbearable. Ok, it’s a cliché but she never complained and lived for each day. She lived with the cancer, against all odds for almost seven years. She was admitted into hospital at the end of november 2012 at her request after the nosebleeds wouldn’t stop and the pain kicked in. She held out for about ten days whilst she/we prepared for her passing you know, doing all the paperwork regarding the estate etc etc. When she was convinced she had done all she could to facilitate the smoothest of transitions from her death to the notaire’s work plus all the bank documents etc etc she allowed the doctors to start the morphine. She was in a coma for about seven days before breathing her last moments, she was 56.

    Now my good lady lived every day to the full even when she was at her worst cos’ that’s the way she was. I would have assisted her any way possible to ease and / or curtail her suffering if she had asked me and I would have faced the consequences.

    I’m the opposite to her. I want a quick end when i’m obviously  facing the end so no prolonging life for me plus no prolonging the agony for the family members.

    I wouldn’t want anyone to have to go through what I had to endure. I was duty-bound to help my wife who I loved dearly to the end but I celebrated the day of her passing as it released me too….

    5+
    #486308

    john
    Participant
    • Topics: 6
    • Replies: 157
    • Contributions: 163
    • Scout
    • ★★★

    Member since
    7th January 2018

    100% respect to you Mr James

    4+
    #486313

    Fruitcake
    Participant
    • Topics: 110
    • Replies: 5263
    • Contributions: 5373
    • Mega Star
    • ★★★★★★★★

    Member since
    13th July 2018

    Respect for respecting your late wife’s wishes Pete which must have been such a hard thing to do and for the honesty of your posting, I suspect there are many people who find themselves in that same position and who, if they’re honest, feel exactly the same as you did, as you said in your last paragraph.

    It is, as has been said, a very emotive subject, as is your story Jean. A dear friend of ours (mentioned briefly in my posting previously) is in a home due to advanced Alzheimers, his wife cared for him herself until the decision had to be made after discussion with her two children (or I think she would have had a breakdown) I ring her each day to see how she is coping and how he is, she often says that, like your Mum Jean, he would be mortified to be how he is, incontinent, not recognising the daughter he has always doted on, nor the son, who finds it so difficult to visit the man he has always looked up to, often in a strange assortment of clothing. She once said that it would have been better for him and for her if he had died, and immediately felt guilty for voicing the thought to me – I get it, I understand it. She has now got suspected Parkinson’s illness and is awaiting an appointment in October to confirm. Life is so very cruel at times!

    0
    #486488

    Jean Matthews
    Participant
    • Topics: 26
    • Replies: 318
    • Contributions: 344
    • Chief
    • ★★★★

    Member since
    20th March 2016

     

    Jean, if in a moment of clarity, before full dementia set in, she had asked you to help her end things, would you have tried? I can’t imagine any court, if someone was found guilty, finding it appropriate to imprison the assister, given all the circumstances.[/quote]

    Difficult one to answer VK but she quite often said when her mobility was getting worse and probably she was aware that she was suffering from dementia  ‘ If this is my life I don’t want it ‘

    0
    #486499

    Admin Paul
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 5
    • Replies: 31
    • Contributions: 36
    • Explorer

    Member since
    23rd June 2019

    I just want to record my respect to you all who have posted on this thread. It is an immensely difficult subject, with no right or wrong “answers”. The way you have all approached it has really impressed me.

    2+
    #486590

    Dom
    Participant
    • Topics: 5
    • Replies: 137
    • Contributions: 142
    • Scout
    • ★★★

    Member since
    22nd February 2019

    Pete, very moving story. Makes me feel so humble. Bless you.

    1+
Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.