Home Forums Financial & Legal Below the poverty line?

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  • #411650

    Fruitcake
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    Well I didn’t realise that we were classed as below the poverty line until I read this paragraph from an article entitled ‘President of the rich’ about president Macron

    Nearly 45 percent of the town’s 30,000 residents live below the poverty line, surviving on less than 1,000 euros ($1,150) a month.

    We’ve done that a lot! I must say I’ve never felt poverty-stricken as such, but obviously we don’t have the social problems that these people have.

    The article is here if anyone is interested

    https://www.france24.com/en/20180913-macron-tackles-france-poverty-problem-8-billion-euros-president-rich

     

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    #411656

    commandomum
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    I have existed since coming here on UK state benefit which is a lot less than some of these “poor poor pooooor” immigrants from W Africa etc

    I did not bring poverty with me, I did not bring extreme cultural differences and difficulties with me, I do not believe that these people that Macron talks about are political refugees/immigrants, I worked in UK and saved what I could to put a roof over my head, I embraced the new life I have made for myself here-

    I just wonder what the future holds for myself and other UK expats/immigrants- already I have seen immigrants move into my village, dismantled the whole front of a lovely house 4 meters from our church (there is leglislation about that!), huge piles of boulders and stones left in a heap in front of the house, 9 cars in various stages of decay in the “so-called back garden”, a low bed truck falling apart, 2 cars with their bonnets up. This happened months ago and it is right outside the Mayors building so he sees it everyday- the sight of all this has not changed for months. When I asked why it is allowed to remain like this he says with a shrug “well they bought the house”. There have been umpteen families, women shrouded in robes with only their face visible, children like door steps living at various times in what remains of the ajoining house, young adults on their expensive mobile phones hanging around the house, when the house was “dismantled” the family /ies who lived there at that time used the facilities at the Salle to wash and use the loo but it was left in a horrendous state apparently- I could go on and on and on- The Mayor does not seem to care, the French people who live in the village do not seem to care- it is honestly the few British who live here who are horrified at what is happening and BEING ALLOWED TO HAPPEN.

    So Mr Macronbefore you start to support and aid those people you have house in that ghetto, PLEASE have a thought about the people who worked their socks off to make a decent home for themselves in your country- who have tried so hard with limited funds, who have fed into your economy, who have paid their taxes here, who have renovated, restored and loved their houses in both small villages and larger towns…

    Think of what we have contributed to your country- some of us may never be citizens here but we are trying our best to be part of France, our chosen country

    Look beyond the areas where you have these ghettos and hope they never become “no go areas ” for terrorism etc which has happened in so many other countries- hopefully you will see sense and remember the rest of us when you come to hand out the next lot of your platitudes/aid/apologies etc

     

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    #411657

    Angela
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    I read the article you pointed out FC and it appears to me that the 1000 euros is per person.  That seems a lot of money for a household of 2 adults to be poor on.  And I, of course, understand that not all households are made up of 2 adults.  Can’t post anymore as my posts usually disappear if I write too much and then I can’t log out.

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    #411664

    tigre
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    I think the 1000 euro income could mean for families, may be that includes benefits, not sure though.

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    #411674

    Marie
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    When I see ‘poverty line’ I always think the same: how many of these people drink alcohol, smoke, take drugs, have tattoos……. If they can afford any of the above they ain’t poor!

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    #411687

    Roger Wood
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    TBH I really don’t know what to make of the original post…..Their culture is different and it is not what probably we want to see as neighbours but Macron can do nothing about what people do in their homes. The church, may or may not have a say in what occurs, not all churches have that power through the DDE but I would think the Maire will have a say if things get worse.

    Having said all that, there is an old French chap in the commune not too far away, who repairs strimmers, lawn mowers, mopeds and the like and his front garden is absolutely flowing over with items that will never work again. He had a clean up a few years ago, now it’s back to how it was a  few years ago. Not a lot you can do I’m afraid. As you say, even your French villagers are not doing anything about it. C’est la France…for sure.

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    #411688

    commandomum
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    Yes Roger –

    It is very sad how lovely villages are becoming an eyesore but I do not think a lot of it is to do with “poverty” or an immigration issue. I think honestly that it has a lot to do with a laissez faire attitude and the fact that people become entrenched in their values – good or bad

    But I still maintain that a lot of problems are caused by bunching people together in an enclave or ghetto area where there is no obvious way out.

    It is a shame- I have many friends of different ethnic backgrounds both in UK and here but I honestly think that the issue of lumping together people who have a different cultural background is no way to integrate anyone… especially if they have arrived here under the guise of “looking for a better way of life”

    I think it is very sad and other countries have experienced problems whether thru poverty or not- which has become detrimental to their culture and society

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    #411693

    Roger Wood
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    Yes that can be a problem CM but thankfully your post on “favourite things” thread today shows you still love your part of Brittany warts and all. Long may your  love of Brittany continue…

     

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    #411695

    tigre
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    I’ve always wondered why Governments don’t give vouchers for certain benefits, these vouchers can only be spent on food, may be even certain foods that may help undernourished children, rather than cash that can be spent on MacDonalds, fags and booze and vouchers for electricity and gas only.

    There’s no excuse for your neighbour, Roger, it’s just laziness, yet you sometimes hear of the Mairie writing to people with holiday homes to get their grass cut because it’s too long and looks an eyesore.

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    #411696

    commandomum
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    Yes Roger-

    I love Brittany and I love my home and life here, my french friends and neighbours. I left UK because I felt it had very little left to offer me and will do anything to remain here. I feel sad that the life I had in UK was , for many reasons, becoming something I did not want to be a part of. I worked in Ascot and during the last few years I lived there it was gradually becoming a place where it felt unsafe to go out in the evening. Too many young men who couldnt string two words of English together roaming around the streets. Of course there were young english men as well but the attitude of a lot of the immigrant population left a lot to be desired.

    I think most of the problems started a long time ago and the issues now raised are a result of – lets help every illegal or legal “Tom Dick and Harry”-. They say hindsight is a wonderful thing and it is fine to share and look after each others’ well being but not at the risk of what is left of any country’s welfare.

     

     

     

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    #411714

    Jazzy
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    Important to remember that not every Brit living here is like you or I commandomum. There’s plenty of ne’er do wells believe me….

    Lots of Brits here who cant string 2 words of French together either….

     

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    #411719

    commandomum
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    That made me laugh J

    Brought a lot back into perspective too!

    :)

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    #411731

    Fruitcake
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    It’s a tricky subject. the heading says ‘France’s poverty’ indicating it is about the country as a whole but the article is highlighting one particular area.

    A reason given for the problems with educating the children was

    Some parents struggle to communicate in French, let alone help with homework.

    Any expats with children at school here could possibly cite that as a reason to ask for help if they were struggling with the language but we mostly expect to learn and integrate so I doubt there would be much sympathy meted out.

    The parents have brought their children into the environment unprepared and the authorities then wonder why the children go awry, though I do agree with C/Mum about grouping people together in an enclave being a big cause of the problems because they’re all in the same situation of poverty and lack of understanding so the kids naturally cling to one another, if they had to integrate into a school with French children, rather than the majority being those of their own ethnic background they would soon learn the language and probably teach their parents, which in turn would better enable the parents to look for work.

     

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    #411812

    koat
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    integrated schools are definitely the way to go (slightly off-topic: it would have sorted out northern ireland’s problems years ago but still isn’t on the agenda). it’s difficult to enact as, say you decide that x% need to be of x socio-economic background, this would need to be rolling depending on the mix living in an area and as mentioned above the area may be ghettoised anyway. even if not there are loads of reasons why people won’t mix with each other ie often ‘middle class’ parents don’t want their kids at school with poor kids from ‘dysfunctional’ families

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    #411829

    Fruitcake
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    You’re right koat, it would probably be difficult to activate it and you’re also right that sometimes snobbery, or even reversed snobbery, comes into it. I guess there is no easy solution, but it’s a shame that the integration in schools can’t happen, it does in some instances and it’s got to be better for all concerned, children end up being multi-lingual for one thing, which can’t be a bad thing!

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    #411839

    Jazzy
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    I totally agree that enclaves and ghettos are not a good idea but sometimes there is massive resistance from existing residents when the authorities try to move them into communities. I know this for a fact. Recently the mayor of a village here in Brittany wanted to turn an empty building into accommodation for vetted immigrants as a staging post for integration into the community. There is a massive abattoir nearby that would have provided employment.

    There were protests from certain members of the community, horrid, racist posters appeared all over the village and meetings about the issue attracted intimidating right wing and national front type groups who didn’t even live in the village. They even threatened violence against the mayor and the immigrants if they ever arrived.

    This is a true story, I was living in this village at the time and knew people who attended the meetings and were at the vote.

    The final vote saw the plan being voted against. Is it any wonder they end up in ghettos?

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    #411866

    koat
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    children/young people growing up in ghettos are stigmatised and don’t have the opportunities of others. even if a great kid (kind, smart) does well in a ‘bad’ school they still won’t get the job

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    #411870

    tigre
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    The trouble sometimes is the lack of understanding of how different nationalities live in their own countries, their attitude to things, culture etc, some of them will never adapt in to western society, I can see and understand both sides of the coin, the fear that locals have and often rightly so, and the problem the immigrants face trying to adapt. What often seems to us to be an easy ideal solution can go belly up, there’s no quick fix really.

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