Home Forums Food & Drink Ceramic baking beads

This topic contains 17 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 1 year, 1 month ago.

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  • #386466

    Anonymous
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    …………or beans! Does anyone know if these are sold in supermarkets? Both amazon.fr and ebay.fr sell them for around €6.89 for 500g PLUS €6.99 for delivery! Must be cheaper elsewhere surely?

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    #386467

    BartyB
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    If you buy them from amazon UK they’re £9.23 including delivery for 500gm, which if I paid with my euro card would cost me €10.98 so there’s nearly a €2 saving

     

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    #386468

    Virago
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    Yes, I’ve seen the ceramic balls in Intermarché and La Foir’fouille, also Ikea.  They are amongst the cooking utensils.  Can’t remember how much they are though.

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    #386469

    BartyB
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    or this pack from .fr  at €8.71 comes up as free delivery when you go to purchase

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    #386471

    tigre
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    You can use dry rice or beans as an alternative, and after if stored in an air tight tin can be used again.

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    #386482

    Anonymous
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    Tried the dried rice and it tells you to cover pastry with baking parchment which is back to square one. Anne has since told me that she used dried peas so will have a look in Leclercs on Tuesday. Thanks to one and all for your help! :good:

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    #386488

    Jazzy
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    I bought a pack of the cheapest dried beans from the supermarket and store and reuse each time. You do have to cover the pastry with parchment before pouring in the beans though…

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    #386489

    BartyB
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    Baking parchment is what we used to call grease proof paper?

     

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    #386491

    Jazzy
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    Baking parchment is what we used to call grease proof paper?

    Yep Barty. Not sure why it was renamed, a bit like Marathons becoming Snickers and so on…. :scratch:

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    #386493

    Jean Matthews
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    Bought mine in Foire Fouille

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    #386499

    Anonymous
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    Are you a bit of a chef then BE?

    If I recall historic documents were written on parchment. Why would they write on greaseproof?

    We always seem to have issues with French flour. Whether we use farine de gateaux or farine de ble. We recently made Cod and chips and the batter rose like doughnuts. The Yorkshires never work and  pancakes are too heavy. Luckily Mrs Cawas has an ever replenishing supply of Flour from home but any tips would be well recieved. Thanks

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    #386501

    Anonymous
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    Picked it all up from Anne coldandwetatsea. She was cook at the “Penny Farthing” restaurant in Shrewsbury in the late 60’s. Whilst there she cooked for such as Billy Wright, Sacha Distel, Richard Greene and David Bruce. She finished her catering career as manageress and licence holder for the “Arches” coffee lounge/restaurant at Wetherells in Selby.

    Coffee Lounge

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    #386502

    Jean Matthews
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    CAWS  Always use Farine de Gateaux from Netto for my cakes always turn out fab especially the Victoria sandwiches

    Use Type 55 from Eclerc for my Yorkshires etc  never had a problem

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    #386515

    Anonymous
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    Thank you JM will get some type 55 next time we are in Le Clerc.

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    #386626

    tigre
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    I think parchment paper is what the Americans tend to call it.

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    #386628

    Anonymous
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    Yes but surely putting the water proof paper onto the pastry stops the moisture getting out and you still have a soggy bottom? :-(

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    #386652

    Jean Matthews
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    I blind bake then take out beans and paper and return to the oven for 10 mins to dry out voila No ‘Soggy bottom’ :good:

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    #386655

    Anonymous
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    I do the same as Jean and I use dried chickpeas to tip onto the paper (papier de cuisson) I keep them in a storage jar just for the purpose, seems to work okay.

    I use any supermarket own brand gateaux flour plus a level teaspoon of levure chimique (baking powder) for each cake that seems to work okay too, however, I usually use any farine de blé for plain flour recipes and have to say that the Yorkshires can be a bit hit and miss so will try the type 55 that JM recommends.

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