Home Forums Food & Drink Conger eel.

This topic contains 16 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 1 year, 4 months ago.

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  • #384085

    Anonymous
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    Helped to catch  one of these beggars off Whitby many years ago. Just bought a large fillet today but have no idea which is the best way to cook it. Internet is useless, full of contradictory advice! Only cost €4/kg so had to get some! Any recipe advice?

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    #384086

    Anonymous
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    Sorry, no help from me I’m afraid. One look at them and I wanna puke! Sorry  :yes:

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    #384088

    Lipstick
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    I’ve never tried it, but this

    http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/eel-with-olives-chiles-and-capers-em-anguilla-livernese-em-350725

    is probably the route I’d go. Sounds quite nice.

    Lippy

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    #384089

    Stinky
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    Hi BE, not sure of the thickness of your fillet, but conger is good, cut into steaks,’tis a meaty fish, and grilled brushed with olive oil and lemon juice. Baked is also supposed to be good, but I have only ever grilled or pan fried.
    Treat it a bit like fishy pork steaks.

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    #384090

    Anonymous
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    Looks good Lipstick apart from the fennel which Anne & I detest! However, as it’s just a garnish we’ll leave it out. Many thanks from us both. :good: It’s around an inch thick Stinker,  your suggestion will be tried the next time we can get it cheap! :yes:

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    #384091

    Stinky
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    Did reply BE, but I was too slow in typing.

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    #384105

    Anonymous
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    Conger can have a slight taint to it, I find that gently poaching helps or alternatively add a favoured herb as has been suggested.

    I have also often made superb jellied eels and also smoked it and combined it with other fish and seafood to make a delicious fish stew. Have also had it pan fried for breakfast.

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    #384134

    Anonymous
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    I really don’t like fish of the eel & huss variety, yet I was brought up with cockney parents loving jellied eels and my Dad loved huss, or as he called it rock salmon or rock eel. I find those and plaice too sweet for my pallet, give me a nice bit if cod any day!

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    #384142

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    If you like Cod FC you will probabally like Pollock too, its similar but somewhat dryer than Cod. Rock is basically Dogfish, of which there are a nuber of species. Different species though have different tastes. Spur dog and Bull huss are very tasty but Smoothound and Tope to my palate are ineddible.

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    #384144

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    Yes CASWAS I do like Pollock. We eat a lot of Lieu noir ( which I know is Saithe and similar to Pollock) and Colin ( which I know is hake) simply because they are more affordable than cod, but don’t really compare to the lovely creamy, yummy flesh of cod, mind you I’m thinking of the cod Mr. F. used to catch and which we ate so fresh! Those were the days!

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    #384145

    Lipstick
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    BE let us know how you’ve got on when you’ve eaten your eel, and how you cooked it.

    Lippy

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    #384147

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    FC your description of the creamy Cod brings back a host of very happy memories. Not many people get to enjoy fish at it absolute perfection. In the very old days, a very good friend of mine and my Grandparents would be supplied with all sorts of fish constantly and at its very best. They all though favoured the Cods heads which they fought over. They boiled them and picked the meat off the bones either eating it hot as they went or sometimes pressing it into a terrine. The other dish they all liked and so do I  was very fresh Spratts cooked in salted water until it boils then immediately served with fresh bread real butter and a glass of Cider. Sometimes the cheapest is the best.

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    #384151

    Anonymous
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    Making my mouth water caswas! We also used to enjoy the mackerel my man caught when he was beach fishing, they were the days of the fish brick and I would stuff them with gooseberries and bake them in the brick – delicious! All of the fish caught tasted so much the better for being so fresh, as you say not many people get to enjoy fish that fresh, you can’t beat it!

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    #384171

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    Anne concocted a stew from the advice given on here. Red bell peppers, prawns, chives, fish stock, garlic, skinned and de-pipped tomatoes  and of course the conger eel. Delicious with plenty of bread for mopping up! :good:

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    #384181

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    Sounds lush BE, especially if washed down with a bottle of red.

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    #384183

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    FC, I have not heard of a fish brick, please tell? My Mother though used to like Mackerel and Gooseberries.

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    #384186

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    Fish bricks were quite popular back in the day they were basically a bottom and a lid made of terracotta, shaped like a fish, so like a clay oven. I guess tinfoil does the job today but doesn’t sound so exciting! Yes, there is something about the two flavours of gooseberries and mackerel that go together well (IMO) possibly the sharpness of the gooseberries cuts down the oil of the mackerel.

    Glad you had success with your eel stew BE.

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