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  • #150939

    tigre
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    I wouldn’t know about the other high street opticians and what they offer as I have only been back in the UK for 18months. It is sensible to book your next appointment when you have had your check up, just as you would the dentist. Of course not all expats have even had a first visit yet to a French eye specialist and as said it can be a lengthy wait, hence my original post about a check up in the UK. Tescos website looks as if they do more than just an eye test, I don’t think you would expect them to have a full range of equipment like a hospital/ clinic would, but it seems they do have equipment that can detect problems other than just poor vision in need of glasses, of course if anything else is picked up that needs looking at by a specialist then your GP is in a position that he can expedite an appointment. As for Specsavers, I just booked an eye test and to my surprise received much more than that, I never requested it at the time of booking, or asked for it on my arrival.

     

     

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    #150966

    tigre
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    It seems that retinol photography is an optional extra when having an eye test at a high street opticians, Specsavers, however include it free for anyone over 40yrs. Boots opticians have an offer on costing £12.50, well worth it for peace of mind.

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    #150981

    Anonymous
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    Ophthalmologist’s in France are self employed, its a business. The average one turns over around two hundred thousand euros a year, expenses are usually equipment, premises and a secretary. No idea what the total cost of the overheads are, but looks to me that an income before tax of around 120, 000 is probably realistic. Prescription glasses are available from 17€ a pair, its normally the frames that cost you the money once you get above 100€. Glasses are a very good little earner, which is obviously why there are so many opticians about. Hearing aids are another good little earner. Then we come to mutuels, be very careful, when it says we reimburse 100%, it usually means 100% of what the state reimburses.

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    #150987

    Andrea Turner
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    I have a full eye test and it doesn’t cost me a euro as 100% here in France

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    #151013

    Anonymous
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    bo, that’s a lot of money but obviously not enough to attract people to train for several years or so and that is the worry for the French.
    From a French site and translated:

    The professional development of an ophthalmo is related to the mode of practice of his profession: if he practices in his office in town, the prospect is to change his clientele. In addition, a city ophthalmo often performs, in parallel, consultations in the hospital.

    Within the framework of the hospital, he is responsible for the care of a hospital service (management of a specialized department), as well as teaching duties at a university hospital.

    Wages : From 3 600 € to 4 000 € gross per month for a beginner ophthalmo, but the figures are very disparate. Thus, the average income, all seniority combined, would be of the order of 9 000-10 000 € gross per month.

    I suspect this can vary depending on the optho but it is better than the average for a Doctor (who themselves look abroad for a better salary)

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    #151084

    Anonymous
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    No idea where some of these websites get their figures from, so work it out for yourselves. Average doc sees four people an hour, normally starts around nine, work’s till around half seven, plus a Saturday morning. 26€ x 4 = 104€ an hour, 8,000 a month relates to 77 hours a month, which is a lot less than what the average doc work’s. Works out at only 308 patients a month, some docs see over 200 patients a week. Ophthalmologists are the same. My old ophthalmologist had her appointments running like a production line, in out in out, five an hour.

    I think the answer to a lot of the problem is quite simple. I once asked an architect why architects were so expensive in France. His answer was the number of architects in the system were controlled to keep architects in demand in work and well paid, maybe its a similar system with ophthalmologist’s.

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    #151092

    Anonymous
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    Sorry but no way does our GP in a large commune have full books every day all week, every month, every year. There are two toubibs in the practice and hardly a wait if you come in a few minutes before your time. There is an obvious danger in just simply working out hours/clients and coming up with a very dodgy figure for a salary. Unless of course you have sat in a surgery all day for most of the year, then I bow to your mathematics. However it doesn’t auger well when French doctors are leaving in search of better salaries elsewhere

    I did laugh at your optho seeing 5 an hour, might be the case for yours, it certainly isn’t in ours. I am usually in for 15 minutes or more and sometimes I have to have drops in the eye and wait a further 15 minute to 30 minutes to go back in and I doubt that more than one person goes in while I wait.

    Our closest friend was/ is an Architect, he never mentioned that in 20 years or so, seems quite bizarre, what do they do, cull the ones before retirement so a job might become available for a new one to take his place? You could ask the same question about why any trade is expensive here, hardly controlled though are they. Plenty of trades taking your breath away with devis.

    I gave you the French reason for lack of Opthos but if you know better than the French health journals explanation, well ……

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    #151098

    Anonymous
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    Obviously yes some docs have quieter practices, but the average income is around 100,000 a year. With Architects it’s  limited training place’s which acts as a way of controlling numbers. Docs are also usually self employed, a lot of consultants are also self employed, but as my consultant told me, its not all down to money, quality of life is also very important, and after spending eighteen months working in London, he returned to France on a lower income but in his opinion a lot better quality of life.

    My new opthalmologist is quite a nice chap, quite thorough, but he managed to deal with four of us in less than an hour, and my old opthalmologist regularly had the waiting room full and people waiting outside in their car’s.

    One must also assume that if the average income is 9,000 a month, some people earn a lot more, and some earn a lot less.

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    #151110

    Vegemite Kid
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    You’re very lucky with your doctors, Sid; whenever I’m at mine, not often it’s true, the waiting room’s full and there’s at least a 20 minute wait. The last time for my wife it was a wait of 2 hours. At the dentist, though, very few people, but still a 3 or 4 week delay before an appointment.

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    #151193

    Anonymous
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    Lucky? In 30 years or so at whichever Doctors we have been with we have never had a surgery where you had to wait for hours or even much over 30 minutes.We have been with our Doctor now for 18 years, the surgery has two Doctors and runs an appointment system. The most we ever see is probably no more than six people in the waiting room and in general the practice runs to time. More times than not there is just one maybe two people waiting when either of us get there, so by the time one may have seen the other Doctor, we will be odds on to be next as our appointment time is close or just past.

    Eight hundred metres away is another practice, where a married couple are the GP’s, our Daughter goes there as she prefers to see a lady Doctor, she barely waits long for a visit and they have not got an appointment system as such but if you call them, they will tell you the best time to arrive going on the number of calls they have had for a visit to see one of the Doctors.

    So are we lucky, or indeed are others like yourself, unlucky? Postcode perhaps?

    Our local Dentist is now in a brand new complex, with phyio dept and infirmières. Waiting time is around 7-10 days but with emergencies fitted in same day whenever possible. There a few around us, so there is a choice within 10kms either way, some closer.

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