Home Forums Recipe Swap Pickled things

This topic contains 29 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  Blue velvet 2 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #57912

    Anonymous
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    • Scout
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    I’ve just finished the final batch of pickled onions so thought I’d share the other things I’ve pickled.

    Left to right are :- pickled  Roscoff  onions, pickled curry cauliflower, pickled curry courgette, Sweet chilli jam.

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    #57914

    Blue velvet
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    Looks good, nice with some lovely cheese and homemade bread. Well Done Vic! :rose:

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    #57919

    tigre
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    They do look good  Vic, I love pickled onions, I used to buy a large jar of them from a local brewery that pickled them in hop vinegar. As Blue says, cheese and good bread, or with sausages or cold meat.

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    #57931

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    Mr. F. always does our pickled onions (although actually they’re pickled shallots) and we’ve already got quite a way down one jar, got another jar to go and more to pickle, must have them for Christmas!

    Your little collection looks good @vic.

    Does anyone still pickle eggs? They were always brought out at Christmas when I was a kid (not sure if that was a Londoner’s thing though, being of cockney stock) and “Walleys” which was what the huge pickled gherkins were called (not sure if the spelling is right!)

    Do you make your own Piccalilli vic? :-)

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    #57946

    tigre
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    I’ve never had pickled Walnuts, are they nice?

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    #57949

    Dibbyspot
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    Pickled walnuts – mm only had the bought variety. An acquired taste I would say but the fresh ones would be much better is my guess if they are sweeter.

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    #57951

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    As a Matter of fact Fruitcake, we are still working our way through the last jar of pickled eggs we did this year.

    We added a couple of dried chillis and peppercorns and left it for about 6 months or so.

    Deelish :yahoo:

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    #57953

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    Assume you folks use “vinagre de malt”, where did you find it Madame Bill don’t know :-)

    Looks good Vic :good:

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    #57955

    Blue velvet
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    I used to buy mine in U.K. And bring it back, because we love homemade pickled onions, for cold meats , cheese etc? My OH eats them like sweets! :yahoo:

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    #57960

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    Fruitcake. I’ve never tried piccalilli but have done lots of pickled eggs. You’ve reminded me to look out the big jars I keep for that purpose & make sure I keep lots of our chooks eggs instead of giving ’em away. The last time I did some the eggs were too fresh & difficult to shell leaving disfigured but none the less tasty pickled eggs so I need to plan about 2 weeks in advance. I always use a mix of  easily available cider & white wine  vinegar with  chillis & other spices to give ’em a bit of a kick.

    My old mum was a Londoner (NW10) so we always had Wallies/Walleys in the house. They were often sold by the chippie down the road.

    Regarding pickled walnuts; these are something I’ve always fancied trying so as we’ve now collected enough to give us about 10 kg of shelled nuts I’ll give ’em a go once the boring job of shelling is done later on in the year.

    The Roscoff onions I pickle are the runts left over from the probable 800 we plant every year. We’ve never managed to get all of ’em to grow big but it doesn’t matter as the sweet little ‘uns are fiddly to cook with but great for pickling.

    Edit. Oops! just looked up a recipe for pickled walnuts & realised I’ve missed the boat this year as it requires whole green nuts. I did use some green ‘uns but that was for Vin de Noix which is now bottled. Oh well!, there’s always next year :wacko:

     

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    #57993

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    I’ve now got an urge to get some eggs pickled – got my taste buds going! We used the brown Vinaigre d’alcool for our shallots, taste great! (Mr. F. has to be a bit careful with vinegar that’s too acidic) We only leave them for a few weeks before eating and they’re still lovely and crunchy!

    When our youngest was a toddler she picked up a pickled onion off of a plate and rammed the whole onion in her mouth, we expected her to pull a face and spit it out but she wandered around with it stuck in her cheek like a gob stopper, eyes streaming and proceeded to crunch her way through it – she still loves them to this day!! :yahoo:

    Yes the chippy always had a big jar of Wallies on the counter I remember Vic and of pickled eggs – ooh I’m really going to get some of those done :yes:

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    #58009

    Gleaner
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    @Vic, hold on to your horses Vic regarding the walnuts. When you say shelling them, when I was a youngun, my folks used to pickle them unshelled. Ok, to clarify, shelled as in the green cover being taken off, but not that hard outer casing. Anyone care to substantiate that claim of mine?

    @coolbriezh, your pickled eggs in chilli were extraordinary mate.

    And Vic, thanks for the photo, I will take your lead as soon as poss and work on making my own larder of such too. Many thanks for  sharing the shot.

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    #58024

    Witchy Poo
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    Pickled walnuts and Roquefort, mmmmmmmmm :good:

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    #58031

    Stinky
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    You can only pickle them when the green skin is still on and all is still soft, the test is a pin prick, pin doesn’t go in, it is to late to pickle them.

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    #58032

    Gleaner
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    Thanks for  that stinky.

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    #58034

    Fitter
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    The old guideline for picking walnuts for pickling is no later than midsummer day.

    We got to ours a little late this year – will have to see how they turn out.

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    #58041

    tigre
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    Fitter, I remember your post regarding getting malt vinegar, did you manage in the end?

    Is it worth me buying a jar of them from thesupermarket, or should I try and track down some homemade jobbies? In other words, are the shop bought ones crap?

    <span style=”line-height: 1.5;”> </span>

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    #58136

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    Without MAKING a trip to the UK, (haven’t been there for years) is it possible to buy, what I would call, vinager for pickling, i.e. Malt Vin.

    The white stuff wouldn’t do for ‘me eggs’, (ok for cleaning the loo with bicarb, ‘fosse friendly’) or do we have to organize a comunal tanker of the real thing. Malt Vin must exist here :-)

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    #58170

    Fitter
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    “Fitter, I remember your post regarding getting malt vinegar, did you manage in the end?”

    We managed to scare a litre of malt vinegar up from the back of the grocery cupboard which some friends brought over for us a year or so ago, but we had forgotten about so carried on with that.

    The shop bought ones were OK from memory, my Dad used to like them as as I remember,  but a bit on the sharp vinegary side. We did a couple of kilos from our own tree this year as an experiment with a sweet pickling recipe involving vinegar, brown sugar, cloves,cinnamon, allspice etc – I dont know how they are going to turn out yet, I will probably try them at christmas with a bit of stilton!

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    #58171

    Fitter
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    “Malt Vin must exist here”

    The problem with finding malt vinegar here in France is that the French don’t seem to do beer as in the UK.

    Their beer is mostly chemical beer without malted barley (that’s why I drink Belgian or Northern France near to Flanders beer) so there is a lack of malt to make the vinegar.

    The French don’t seem to do much in the way of pickling – the taste is probably too strong for them.

    We use red wine vinegar for salad dressings but I’ve never tried it for pickling – another experiment!

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    #58275

    Anonymous
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    Thanks F, OH is French and has no idea where to get it either :-(

    Would love to do some eggs and onions :-)

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    #58308

    Anonymous
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    Vinaigre d’Alcool 6% is what I use, it’s brown like malt vinegar, but obviously isn’t malt vinegar, we find it okay for the pickled onions and am going to try it with the eggs. :-)

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    #58371

    Anonymous
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    Thanks F, will try it.

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    #58495

    Stinky
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    Tomorrow dear friends, I will be pickling my remaining green tomatoes. First time of trying, but apparently, if I get it right, scrummy.

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    #58583

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    That sounds interesting Stinky, have never done those, you’ll have to let us know how they turn out. :-)

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    #58634

    Stinky
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    Will do Fruity.

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    #58842

    Anonymous
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    Well I’ve just been a copy cat!

    I’d never heard of pickled green toms until it was mentioned here so I raided our polytunnel for the remnant green ‘uns & bottled 3 spicey & 3 curry lots very loosely based on this recipe. http://www.gardenbetty.com/2011/08/four-ways-to-pickled-green-tomatoes/ which are cooling as I type.

    I’ll let you know what my, very fussy, chief taster thinks of ’em in a few weeks

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    #58854

    Blue velvet
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    I’m sure that there is a Spanish receipe around Stinky using green tomatoes, I’ll have a root around to see if I can find it.  :rose:

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    #58856

    Stinky
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    Ta Blue, and do let us know in a few weeks Vic

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    #58900

    Blue velvet
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    Well Stinky, I’ve looked in my cookery book, and if your going to make chutney with the green toms and you have maybe 4 or 5 large ones, you could do Green .Fried Tomato with a red tomato salsa or spicy red pepper sauce.

    slice the green Toms about half an inch thick (sorry cannot do metric!)

    dip into flour then beaten egg then breadcrumbs then fry until golden on each side. It’s not a Spanish receipe, but I think an American idea! 🍅🍅🍅🍅🍅🍅

     

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