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This topic contains 33 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  Flowergirl 1 year ago.

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  • #391950

    Lipstick
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    When I first started school I remember the school dinners were awful – it was a very old school with no kitchens as such, so the meals were brought in. They were always overcooked, lukewarm and tasted awful. After a few months we moved house and I was lucky enough to then attend a brand new, modern school with an all-singing, all-dancing kitchen and the meals were fab.

    I especially liked the minced beef pie with gravy and sausage and chips & tomato, but at the time hated the cheese pie (which I love now) with beetroot, and the liver and mash with cabbage.

    The puddings were best though – chocolate crunch ‘cake’ with white custard sauce, cornflake tart with custard, iced lemon sponge with “fairy liquid” sauce (greeny yellow, lemon flavour. Love the sponge, hated the sauce), jam steamed pudding with pink custard sauce. I wasn’t so fond of rice pudding with prunes or ‘frog spawn’ though.  :yahoo:   :good:

    What did you love/hate?

    Lippy

     

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    #391952

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    Wow, your deserts sounded amazing  :good:

    When I was at the grammar school, we could have a ‘hot lunch’, but that meant, bring a tin in!!

    You would go to the kitchen in the morning and write down what you had brought in e.g. large ravioli (you would then usually share this with a friend, and they would bring the next large tin etc.) , small baked beans and sausage and so on.

    All the tins were opened and put on a tray, all morning,  very low, until lunchtime, when you would go to the kitchen and they would tip it into a bowl (or 2), but I’m sure you can imagine the lively skin that had formed on top! But saying that, I couldn’t wait for my ‘hot lunch’  ;-)

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    #391953

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    Lovely skin I meant  :negative:

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    #391957

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    Being of an older generation my infant/ junior school meant a walk down a lane a mile or more long to get to school then a walk from the school to the village hall for dinner. The highlight of my day! I have always loved my food and used to be the only one to go up for cabbage when 2nd helpings were announced “Where’s our cabbage girl?” was the question asked! It was proper homecooked food. I can’t remember if Gypsy tart was then or when I progressed to secondary school but I liked it – couldn’t eat it now, far too sweet!

    Then I used to eat one of Mum’s delicious cooked dinners in the evenings too!!

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    #391960

    Flowergirl
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    When we first came to France I loved to see the little children walking crocodile fashion in two’s to the canteen. My friends little boy would not stay at the canteen as he couldn’t take a packed lunch.

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    #391962

    Blue velvet
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    I walked to school in those days! The midday lunch at secondary school were wonderful!  Except for Pease pudding and the frog spawn stuff! Yuck! On both counts. But I never saw chips all the time we were there! Mash  mostly with the ice cream scoop!  Friday was Salad with raw chopped cabbage, pilchards, beetroot  etc! I quite enjoyed that too, although a lot didn’t ! Mince with a pie crust, braised liver and onions , fab the way they did it! All cooked in the canteen. Sponge and  custard, prunes , we counted them and did the rhyme . I volunteered with my best friend to be waiting on the teachers top table, they had better lunches!  So then so did we!!

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    #391968

    tigre
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    I liked the chips, but of course there were never enough served up! Hated the blancmange, with its thick skin.

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    #391976

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    Your memory’s a lot better than mine BV but you’ve reminded me of one or two things now, loved the minced beef pie, the pastry was always lovely, sometimes had potatoes in it too I seem to remember (or that might have been mum’s version!) Don’t recall ever having chips either, we did use to have plain boiled potatoes and I do remember prunes – loved them! And always did the counting as you say! Loved the custard too with a nice sponge, yes you’re bringing it all back to me!  :yes:

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    #391983

    commandomum
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    when I catch sight of myself in the mirror – sideways, back view, front view- I cannot deny that I enjoyed EVERYTHING that was dished up to me- especially the suet puddings with raisons and custard

    I always sat nearest the serving hatch so that I could be first up for seconds

    Woe is me……………………  : (

    Regards

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    #391984

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    Twenty minute walk to the bus stop, 40 minute bus ride into Sheffield city centre, 20 minute walk to school. Then to crown it all because we, as a family, were paupers I had a different colour dinner ticket (free and yellow) to those who paid 1 shilling (blue). Ah the good old days. The meals were alright but as mentioned previously arrived in large aluminium trays. Favourite was liver and onions followed by tapioca pudding! :good:

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    #391988

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    Me too C/mum! Never have been waiflike for a very good reason!  :-)

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    #391990

    Blue velvet
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    Fruits, my Gran did a super meat and potato pie. It was lovely as was all her food. No scales either . But back to school, good food, but we never got offered seconds, but we knew who didn’t like pie or dumplings etc. We were not allowed to talk at the table either, so devised a swipe of the plate , when the coast was clear!  The headmistress was a bit of a dragon,  but had a soft centre !  Believed in discipline!

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    #391991

    whatnow
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    I never had school dinners, my family couldn’t afford them, with 7 of us, had to walk 1.1/2 miles home for dinner, usually some sort of stew & bread, then walk back to school, then I became milk monitor, handing out bottles of milk, I think they were 1/3 of a pint,most of the children didn’t like it,so I soon drank it,I also remember the free cod liver oil & the orange juice which you diluted, how times have changed.

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    #391992

    Jazzy
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    My school dinners at infant/junior school were mostly good. I even liked the boiled until it was white cabbage. Savoury mince was nice but can remember the bits of gristle in the meat pies – yuk. Was a Catholic school and there was a particular dragon of a dinner lady whose job it was to make sure you ate everything on your plate. Think of all the starving children in Africa etc…

    My favourite Pud was flapjack which was served with a beaker of milky coffee.

    Christmas dinner was lovely too but we were then chucked out into the playground in the cold for ages while the teachers had theirs….

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    #391995

    BartyB
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    “beef” stew that was mostly plumbing, gristle and fat

    Tinned salmon with soft bones

    bleeeeeuuuuugh

     

    Secondary school wasn’t so bad especially when I hit on the plan of going out with one of the girls that worked in the dining halls

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    #391996

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    Come on lasses what’s this prune counting thing? :scratch:

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    #391998

    tigre
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    Barty, I hope you didn’t use these girls just to satisfy your stomach?  :whistle:

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    #392000

    whatnow
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    I liked prunes & custard, in fact, I liked everything that was edible, I suppose if you are hungry you will, no fussy eaters at home, if you didn’t like it you sat there until you ate it, if you didn’t that is what you had for your next meal, sometimes for breakfast.

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    #392001

    Blue velvet
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    Yes Jazzy, we were reminded of the starved children in Africa and China , I donated my favourite doll to a child in Africa I hope they enjoyed her!  We had  people coming from a children’s home called Petzolotzi Village ( spelling!) about all these poor children!  Yes whatnow, same system at school, sit there until you’ve eaten it!  :yes:

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    #392004

    whatnow
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    It use to amuse me, my Grandmother knitted Woolley hats/scarfs & gloves for the poor children in Africa, not sure she realised it was a was a 100 + degrees there, hated having to wind up balls of wool from unpicked jumpers etc, also holding my arms out so she could wind a ball of wool from those scanes.

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    #392005

    Vegemite Kid
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    Maybe similar to this one, BE? Will be corrected if I’m wrong.

    At boarding school from the age of 10, Wednesdays were always the best because there was a brick of ice-cream, white vanilla, strange now to think of it but ice-cream on buttered toast was delicious! Wednesday was also pocket money day and the delivery of fruit orders – sour Granny Smiths and passionfruit were my choices.

    And from as young as 10, enormous tea-urns for everyone to serve themselves from, best to be among the first as the bottom of the urn was always stewed and cold.

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    #392007

    commandomum
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    Talking about woollen hats for African children- Why do most African men wear knitted, bright coloured hats in the extreme heat.

    I have always wondered that-

    Regards

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    #392009

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    #392010

    Stinky
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    School dinners were a shock to me.
    Not because of the quality.
    But because they were there.
    Cyprus and Africa in the early sixties, school started a 7.00 hrs and we were on the bus/lorry home by 13.00hrs.
    No lunch apart from a buttie or some fruit in your snack box.
    Which you ate on the way to school or it melted.
    When we were posted to the Uk for a few months, not arriving at school ’til 9.00 hrs was weird.
    Staying ’til 1530. hrs( or 1700.hrs in Scotland)was weirder.
    But hot school lunches!
    Oh God it was Heaven.
    Some schools good, some bad.
    I totalled 13 schools.
    But I loved the food.
    Skin so thick on the custard.
    Meat that knew you so intimately before you were finally able to swallow it.
    Plates of bread and butter to fill you up.
    Semolinas, sticky puddings, stews, mash, gravy with lumps to navigate around.
    Coloured aluminium water jugs and mugs for water.
    I bloody loved it.
    Fussy kids were targeted and I sat on their table.
    And finished off every thing.
    The Dinner Ladies loved me.
    And I loved them.

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    #392011

    whatnow
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    No not that type of hat, simple bobble hats, my sister had the job of making them bobbles, round & round two cardboard circles.

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    #392013

    tigre
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    Stinky, even the cabbage? ;-)

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    #392015

    Stinky
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    Could not differentiate it from the meat K.
    Same texture.
    Same colour.
    But it was hot and I was hungry.
    Bit fussier now.
    Drink out of glass not aluminium.

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    #392017

    Sue
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    Like commandomum I have always loved my food and that included school dinners.  The only things that I didn’t like was the puddings that included sultanas or raisins.  Favourite meal was steak and kidney pudding, roast potatoes and cabbage and favourite pud was chocolate chip sponge pudding and custard or gypsy tart.  Basically you put it in front of me and I would tuck in.  Have to be more careful now as I no longer play netball, hockey or tennis to burn it all off!!

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    #392018

    Sue
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    Oh Whatnow you have reminded me of the school milk.  I remember the bottles sitting in the crate outside in the winter all frozen and sticking up outside the bottle.  We used to stand them next to the fire so that they defrosted and were lukewarm by the time we got to drink them  :yes:

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    #392020

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    I remember my teacher, at break time saying

    “Milk children, line up”

    They were the ‘undernourished children’ that were given milk to drink because they looked ‘uncared for’.  I was never one of them but remembering being jealous, cos I loved milk  ;-)

    What makes me laugh is, calling them ‘milk children’! Could you say that now?

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