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This topic contains 88 replies, has 22 voices, and was last updated by  Marmite 10 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #425995

    John James
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    That would never do Marmite – brown bread reminds me too much of marmite! Although many would disagree, I always think that brown bread takes the moisture out of whatever’s inside the sandwich so, although it’s probably not nearly so good for me, I’ll stick to white bread – thank you.

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    #425996

    Blue velvet
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    When Beef was proper Beef with a thick rind of yellow fat and when  you cooked it it had wonderful lovely yummy beefy dripping on it! That brings back memories of it on real bread , toasted and spread with abandon, with the jelly bits too!    Oh yes!  :yes:   I adore Marmite!!

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    #426012

    John James
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    What – Marmite on top of your beef jelly BV – that’s getting a bit strong isn’t it!!??

    I don’t care what you lot say, I still hate Marmite!

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    #426018

    Marmite
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    I,m thinking of changing my name!

    pick on vegimite!

    vogel…that’s the brand name of the bread..it’s yummy!

    now has anyone tried smearing their roast with marmite,beef or lamb…before cooking..it’s really good!

    I’m in charge of the aperitifs every Friday in our bridge club…50/60 people ..I haven’t yet introduced them to marmite..when I want to resign I might do it!

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    #426029

    Anonymous
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    #426031

    Anonymous
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    Well I certainly love m.armite   :good:

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    #426036

    Anonymous
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    Marmite I mean (sorry, key board sticking!)

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    #426038

    Marmite
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    Ok give in….

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    #426039

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    Actually I love Marmite but after giving up on bread and losing my “pregnant” tummy I hardly  eat  Marmite now. There is a jar in the fridge and I used to have a spoonful every so often. This has now become just sticking a finger into the jar and sucking it off! :good:

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    #426057

    Marmite
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    That’s gross….I,m not coming to tea!

    put a label on it…..mine!

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    #426058

    Jamie
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    For an delicious entree ,albeit the main mushroom season is nearly over,but find a queen bolette which is both tete de negre and bolet bronzé in French or boletus aereus in latin.

    Cut it into small oblongs, and medium fry in a little heated olive oil. Halfway through cooking add a little garlic and a small shake of turmeric and black pepper.

    I assure you if you get it right,you will be eating something that a 3 michelin star chef would be proud of.

    I have eaten them for many years,but just this year experimented with this recipé as am using a lot of turmeric and black pepper for health reasons. I have tried it on a couple of guinee pigs oops friends and they could not believe how good it was.

    I hope you get to try it xx

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    #426059

    Marmite
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    A lot of people swear by turmeric for health purposes.

    sounds delicious,sadly I’m not a mushroom expert…we have a French friend who brings us a few which  we love but normally Cepes .

    I love recipes and enjoy trying them.

     

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    #426060

    Flowergirl
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    Marmite on white toast with marmalade on top mmmmm 😊

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    #426080

    Anonymous
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    Interesting postings on here.

    In the 50’s my Dad and Grandad Shepherd had 3 adjoining allotments in Rivelin Valley, Sheffield. They grew every veg imaginable. I still have the garden fork Dad & Mam gave me one Xmas in the 50’s.

    When Anne and I married we had a greenhouse given to us as a wedding present. We also took on an allotment but moving from Sheffield to Scunthorpe put an end to that before we really got going.

    Anne loves gardening and the difference she has made to our Breton garden is miraculous. We started a veg garden in our field but thieving made it silly to carry on. However, we grew potatoes and tomatoes by the house but these always succumbed to blight no matter how they were grown. Pointless growing winter veg when you go back to England for winter!

    We then discovered that, to us, modern fruit and veg sold in supermarkets tasted just as good as home-grown. The tomatoes from LECLERC’s are tasty and keep well. All the other fruit and veg are also top notch. We have even gone down the path of buying frozen veg which saves us waste and cooking times seem to be less.

    As for seasonal veg I will just have to say it is probably down to the country you live in. England has always had veg from around the world and it is what Anne and I grew up with and still enjoy.

    Without going through the whole thread and looking names up it has been mentioned that food tastes less than it used to. This could be down to age because, unfortunately, our sense of smell and taste deteriorate over time. The amount of mustard I use now would have incapacitated me in my 20’s!!!

    What we cannot believe is the tinned and bottled veg sold in Brittany it is pap. Overcooked, tasteless and with a less than inviting texture. I swear I can suck bottled asparagus through the gaps in my teeth. It still gives me asparagus wee though! :good:

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    #426085

    koat
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    think boletus is a cèpe with the bronzé version being a darker coloured variety so the recipe should work well if your neighbour brings any more, Marmite

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    #426086

    Vegemite Kid
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    Frozen vegetables are better for you because they go from fresh to snap-frozen in less than a couple of hours and so retain their vitamin content. Vegetables lose their vitamin content with time, so ‘fresh’ vegetables in supermarkets have minimal vitamin content, as they’ve gone from the producer to the distributor to the supermarket in several days.

    As for marmite on white toast with marmalade on top, each to their own. I remember banana and vegemite sandwiches, but I didn’t like those either. Vegemite plain on toast or on a fresh baguette or in a hot pitta is best.

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    #426122

    Jamie
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    think boletus is a cèpe with the bronzé version being a darker coloured variety so the recipe should work well if your neighbour brings any more, Marmite

    Indeed they are a darker variety,but the famed Boletus edulis ( cepe or king bolette ) does not touch the Boletus aereus ( tete de negre or queen bolette) for its subtle and mouth watering tastes.

    I leave many cepes growing where I see them,but would never leave the queen bolette behind and if I did not want to cook it myself,then I would find a good home for it.

    If I remember correctly there are 54 types of bolet that grow in France. A few are delicious,a few are nice,many have no particular degustive value,a few could make you a bit poorly and one could make you very sick or even kill you. Learn of the bolet satan first and make sure you never pick it. xx

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    #426126

    Marmite
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    I started a vegetable garden….I am not a gardener…happily I now have only raspberries…I planted 4,the horse next door ate two…the other two have taken over the vegetable plot…Thankyou raspberries.

    my friends take pity on me and deliver fresh garden picked veggies…

     

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    #426131

    Fruitcake
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    Just caught up with some of the later posts.

    I throw turmeric and black pepper in nearly every savoury dish I cook Jamie, including scrambled eggs! Very healthy!
    It’s true that frozen veg retains the vitamins as it’s frozen before they are lost but with exception of broad beans, peas and sweetcorn I just do not like the taste of frozen veg so am happy to lose a small number of vitamins in favour of taste.
    The talk about mushrooms reminded me of when I was a youngster and my dad used to find the huge flat mushrooms, some as big as a tea plate, that when cooked used to run with black juice, they were delicious but it was a treat that just dad & I used to share as nobody else liked them!

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    #426145

    Jamie
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    Parasols as they are known in english,coulemelle in french or lepiote elevee or lepiote procera in latin being the two nicest of the big flat mushrooms are much tastier when they are young and not yet opened into flat form,so I do understand why no one else was fond of them. Get them young and they are much nicer,though young and large is important as there are a couple of the lepiote family that stay small and are toxic.

    Fresh veg is always better,especially veg that has not been treated by chemicals or is near somewhere where chemicals may infect them.

    As for that black substance in small jars – yuck !!!!!

    I ate some Marmite when I was out travelling around the south pacific islands as it apparently contains something that helps repel mozzies,it did not work however and I ended up with a nasty bout of dengi fever !!!

    Maybe I should of cocvered my skin with it !!

     

     

     

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    #426146

    Anonymous
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    Maybe you should have Jamie!

    Talking about big flat mushrooms, I used to love it when my Mum used to buy Portobellos, slice them and fry in butter and salt, until they were brown. Yum, yum. As a kid…..they seemed huge!

    I also like chestnut mushrooms, instead of button mushrooms sometimes, as they are ‘meatier’ to me.

    I would never pick a mushroom and eat it though. Wouldn’t be able to trust it. Do love them though

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    #426295

    Fruitcake
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    I beg to differ with you @jamie about the field mushrooms (it’s what we called them, as it’s where they were always gathered and we would have had no knowledge of botanical or Latin names) They were thick, meaty, very succulent and absolutely packed with flavour, especially when eaten with crispy, salty bacon. The reason my mum and young brother wouldn’t eat them was not that they were inferior in flavour, it was simply because they didn’t like the fact that they had been picked ‘wild’, dad & I didn’t mind, it meant more for us! Mind you I’m speaking of 60 years ago, perhaps decent field mushrooms are harder to find these days.

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    #426298

    Jamie
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    Sorry Fruitcake ,My mistake was made on you saying that they were flat , which gave me the lepiote family. Field mushrooms or rosé des pres ( think the spellings right on that ) still grow and can be very tasty,but again Tastier when they are younger rather then aged. The field mushrooms did not have flat tops but are white to pinky white domed muchrooms. I suppose they do look quite flat when in a larger form so one could mistake them for being so.

    Its lovely that you have the old memories of such times.

    My early gathering memories come from the west wales coast where my grand dad used to take me out collecting many different types of shell fish , though the peri-winkle has always stayed in my memory as the main one we used to collect. Happy times :-)

     

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    #426373

    Anonymous
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    Just off to stick my finger into the Marmite jar!

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    #426375

    Fruitcake
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    As I said Jamie, it was a very long time ago and childhood memories can be distorted, I just remember collecting them from the field with my dad, some, though not all, of them being as big as a tea plate, black underneath and running with black juice when they cooked, I have no blurring of memory as far as the taste is concerned though.    :good:

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    #426376

    Fruitcake
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    Oh, I meant to say, our daughters have childhood memories of cockling at Greatstone, many a cheap tea was had in those days!

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    #426391

    koat
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    i have a very similar memory, Fruitcake, of collecting field mushrooms with my grandfather. I was lucky enough to spend a few weeks with him when I was 4 or 5 (as he died a year later) and we would head out in the early morning on the farm in Kildare to the field that had good mushrooms. He would spot them and point with his stick and I’d run off to get them. we’d then have them for breakfast fried in butter. i’ve been thinking of him the last few days as he served as a young man in ww1; was in a prisoner of war camp, had a badly wounded shoulder and suffered from ‘shell shock’ (ptsd) after. politics in Ireland changed over the war period and many of the young irish men had to go into hiding on their return from the war :rose:

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    #426392

    Fruitcake
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    Oh koat this is such a poignant time of year for anyone with such memories as you have and your story is a reminder that it was not only those that lost their lives who suffered, others, like your grandfather, suffered long after the war was over. How awful that even then politics decreed that those young men had to then go into hiding!  :cry:

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    #426589

    Marmite
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    My grandmother lived in buck fast Leigh ..she was the youngest daughter and didn’t marry until she was in her 30,s she cared for her parents…her first husband was killed in Bethune aged 23…there was a 12 year age difference…he was killed in the trenches leaving her with two  babes under the age of 3…when she was 42 she married again..this time 11 years younger..she managed another child…then he was admitted to a mental hospital ..mustard gas poisoning…he was there until she was 80… When they announced he could leave the hospital…I seem to remember she was not too happy!

    so many lives spoiled..so much misery…

    we visited his memorial in Bethune…all there is left of a life lost.

    i have digressed…forgive me!

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