Home Forums Home & Garden UPVC windows and condensation

This topic contains 12 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Fruitcake 9 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #425169

    Fruitcake
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    • Mega Star
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    When we bought this house we firstly thought “Shame it has PVC double glazing in some rooms” as we prefer wood, we then thought, hang on a minute perhaps it wasn’t such a bad idea in our advanced years to have less maintenance to worry about and replaced those windows and doors that needed to be replaced with the same.

    We’re pleased with them and the wind-down shutters, however, we didn’t realise what a problem we would have with condensation on the frames of them all. What are your experiences with UPVC, if any?

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    #425177

    Anonymous
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    • Mega Star
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    In very cold weather we get condensation on the glass Never had it on the frames though. We use a battery powered squeegee and it is excellent at removing any water.

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    #425191

    Marmite
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    Most of ours are double glazed wood from Leroy Merlin…no problem with condensation yet…after 15years.

    we had a strange thing earlier this autumn …a wet glaze outside….decided it was humidity in the air …as soon as the sun hit it went.

    for one awful moment we thought it was between the glazing…we have a friend who had a complete wall of French doors all of them with humidity between the glazing…horror!

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    #425275

    Fruitcake
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    BE – no problem with condensation on the windows, they have a very good, thick thermal break. It’s only the frames that get the condensation.

    Marmite – No we’ve never had a problem with wooden double glazed windows either as the wood absorbs it. Oh your poor friends to have all the units on their French doors break down, that must have been a fault in the manufacture with the thermal break not being sealed properly. When I worked for a double glazing company that only happened once and all the units had to be sent back to the manufacturer.

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    #425334

    Fitter
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    We had a bad experience with condensation inside DG units at our last UK house – caused because the dumb builders who built the house puttied the units into the softwood frames – remedied by replacing with proper PVC windows.

    We have DG units in  hardwood frames in our french house, no problems yet in 13 years since they were installed by the previous owners. They are obviously of french manufacture, opening inwards etc.

    How it works to keep the moisture out of the units is that the joint between the outside of the frame and the outside pane glass is not sealed, but the gap around the unit within the frame drains out at the bottom drain slot and holes keeping it dry.

    The joint between the inner glass and the inner frame is sealed with a rubber seal all round.

    To avoid getting condensation in between the panes of DG make sure that the drains at the bottom of each frame are clear and unblocked – there is some sort of insect here that insists on building it’s mud nest in the drain holes and has to be evicted on a regular basis.

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    #425344

    Breadhead
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    Fruity, are you sure that they are UPVC frames and not anodised aluminium.  Aluminium frames can cause problems with condensation due to being colder than plastic.  If they are UPVC they must be getting extremely cold in order for moisture in the air to condense on them.  I have had UPVC in many houses and never experienced condensation on the frames even in very cold weather.

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    #425350

    Fruitcake
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    I don’t really know BH, they are supposed to be UPVC and don’t seem as though they’re aluminium covered with UPVC. It could be to do with not having constant heat as we only have the central heating on late evening and during the night on low, but the sun shines in there all day when it’s out and the rooms never feel cold, the windows in the lounge, where we have a woodburning fire don’t seem to get it. The back door frame runs with it and we have no heating in that area so I think perhaps you are right, they are just perhaps getting too cold?

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    #425481

    Breadhead
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    You have a couple of options it seems, crank up the heating and introduce some heat in the area of the back door or reduce the amount of moisture in the air inside your house with a dehumidifier.  Ventilation also helps but at this time of year is not too desirable, sorry I can’t be of more help.

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    #425528

    Fruitcake
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    Well, we’re trying to conserve the oil for as long as possible BH as the price is so high, I’ll look into the price of dehumidifiers, otherwise I’ll just keep wiping! Thanks for your help and advice, very kind of you.

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    #425554

    Blue velvet
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    Or perhaps, Fruits, you could get those moisture granules that absorbs it, put on every window sil, possible cheaper than a dehumidifier ?  I don’t know if you can get them in France ?

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    #425583

    Fruitcake
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    We haven’t got internal window sills Blue, but thanks for the thought  :rose:

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    #425635

    officer crabtree
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    Condensation happens when warm moist air meets cold air This means that either the frames have not been insulated properly  the rubber seals around the frames/glass have have perished allowing cold air in or there are gaps between the frames and the wall

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    #425714

    Fruitcake
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    There is no condensation on the windows themselves nor on the frame that they are hinged on, it’s the outer framework and it seems worse since we insulated the wall with polystyrene backed plasterboard!

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