Home Forums Recipe Swap Winter Solstice Rich Fruit Cake

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  • #397280

    Anonymous
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    • Scout
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    I made some reference to this cake in a post some time ago, and Fruitcake asked for the recipe. I accept no liability for any injury or harm, physical, mental or otherwise to anyone, howsoever caused, to anyone following, or even attempting to follow this recipe, or any member of their family, household, or guests or any other person eating or attempting to eat this cake. Terms and conditions apply.

    Winter Solstice Rich Fruit Cake

    10 oz (283g) butter  – 10 oz sugar

    1 level tablespoon golden syrup  – grated rinds of 2 lemons

    5 large eggs  –  12 oz (340g) plain flour

    2 tablespoons of brandy, whisky, rum, sherry, port or whatever you prefer (and at least as much in your glass as a taster, although I personally take slightly more)

    1 teaspoon mixed spice –  half teaspoon powdered cinnamon

    3 lb (1360g) mixed dried fruit*  –  4 oz (113g) blanched chopped almonds

    4 oz  halved or quartered glace cherries

    * you can use 1½  lbs of currants, ¾ lb each of raisins and sultanas and 4 oz of chopped mixed candied peel, instead of the ready-mixed fruit

    Cream the butter and sugar with the golden syrup and lemon rinds. Continue beating until the mixture is soft and light. Whisk the eggs and liquid and gradually beat into the creamed butter mixture, adding a bit of sieved flour if it shows signs of curdling.

    Mix the fruit and cherries, adding the spices, then add gradually to the butter mix together with the flour, stirring thoroughly to give an even mix. Some people like to soak the dried fruit in the alcohol overnight before making the cake. I may try this next time. Two tablespoons my prove to be too little for this, but I would advise against using too much, as the fruit may be too moist, and this could affect the final texture.

    Put the mixture into a prepared 9 inch (23cm) cake tin, preferably a spring loaded one with a removable base to make removal of the cake easy. I line my tin with grease-proof paper (papier cuisson as sold by Carrefour).

    Bake in a moderate oven 325-350°F (163–177°C) for 1¼ hour, then lower the heat to 300°F  (150°C) for a further 2½ hours. After the first hour it should be turning to pale golden. If too dark, lower the heat. Test cake during the last half hour to see if it is cooked by pushing a fine skewer or even a very thin knife into the cake. If it comes out clean, the cake is cooked. If it is sticky, give more time.

    If using a fan oven, temperatures should be reduced by about 20°C.

    When baked, remove the cake from the baking tin, but do not remove the grease-proof paper. Leave to cool completely. Some people say leave it in the baking tin until cool, which would certainly be advisable if you don’t have the quick release kind of tin.  Once completely cool, store in a large cake tin for several weeks to allow it to mature. I sometimes leave mine for up to three months, occasionally pouring a small amount (tablespoon) of port or whisky (brandy or sherry can be used, but I never have any in the house) evenly onto the cake. It is always a good idea to taste the alcohol before adding it, just to make sure it isn’t tainted. Well, that’s my excuse!

    Just to confirm what I said earlier, I accept no responsibility for this recipe, but I have made some really wonderful cakes in the past using it. Dare I say it, they were the best I have ever tasted!

    As for Mr Kipling, go back to writing exceedingly good stories for the Jungle Book, and stop making crap food.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    #397298

    commandomum
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    Mmmmmmmmmmmmm

    Do I think this sounds great – YES- Yummy  : )

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    #397337

    Fruitcake
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    Thank you for posting the recipe JD, that will have to be one for special occasions I think!

     

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    #397363

    Anonymous
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    Oh if only I wasn’t on a diet…..again!  :cry:

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    #397446

    Anonymous
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    CM, I notice you advise to reduce the temperature of a fan oven. I have cooked a number of FC’s Malt Loaves, everybody who tries it loves it but the top keeps spliting. Should I reduce the temperature by 20 per cent?

    I will be doing this cake CM, is is similar to a Christmas cake? If so should it be marzipanned and iced?

    Thank you

     

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    #397447

    Vegemite Kid
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    Cawas, it is JD’s recipe, nip in quick and edit your post before 30 minutes have passed!

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    #397449

    koat
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    thanks for the recipe jd; think i’ll try making one for my mum’s visit in October. she’s a big christmas cake fan but this looks easier to make  :rose:

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    #397450

    Anonymous
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    Sorry JD and CM. My mistake. NO mistake about the recipe though

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    #397473

    Fruitcake
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    CAWAS The temperatures I use are for ordinary ovens so as a cracked top of the cake can indicate a too hot oven I would do as you say and reduce your fan oven a little and see how it goes. Even ordinary ovens have their idiosyncrasies from each other, the oven I have now seems to cook hotter than the last one I had, it’s a bit trial and error with baking!

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    #397647

    Anonymous
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    • Scout
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    I found that the cake was slightly over cooked a few times using the recommended times, with a few currants on the top edges turning black. I scraped them off. Inside was fine. I reduced the time slightly, then I read that the temperature should be reduced in a fan oven. The last one was near perfect.

    Many years ago I used to marzipan and ice the cake, but it must be more than 20 years since I last did that. Now I just arrange halved almonds in circles around the top as a finishing touch.

    The original recipe, which I changed slightly to suit myself, called it a rich christmas or wedding cake, but I don’t do christmas or weddings, so I renamed it. My new name suggests that it is for the winter months, but I make it any time of the year when the mood takes me. As Fruitcake said, it is a cake for special occasions, but when you get to my age every new day is a special occasion.

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    #397667

    Anonymous
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    JD, please confirm if the blanched chopped almonds go in the cake or just on top. Thanks

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    #397669

    Fruitcake
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    CAWAS I would think JD means halved almonds, round side up, arranged on the top of the cake in a circular pattern, starting from the middle and widening the circle as you go towards the outside, as you would have on the top of a Dundee cake, but I’m sure JD will confirm and of course, as with all cake baking you can adapt to suit your own taste, you could put halved walnuts I expect for example.

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    #397674

    Fruitcake
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    JD do you get currants imported as I have not found them here anywhere?

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    #397737

    Anonymous
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    The chopped almonds mentioned in the recipe go in the cake. The halved ones are in addition, and are purely for decorative effect. They are optional, and obviously are not needed if the cake is to be iced.

    Fruitcake, I ask friends to buy me dried mixed fruit in the UK. Buying individual packs of currants, sultanas and raisins in France would be very expensive. And  your description of how I arrange them is quite correct. I also arrange alternate circles midway between the others rather than having them radiating out in straight lines. And walnuts, chopped for the mix or halved for decoration can be used instead of almonds.

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    #397810

    Anonymous
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    Thanks JD, I will get the rest of the ingredients tomorrow.

    Talking of Kipling, I did used to like his country or farm style fruit cake, if anyone has a recipe, I would appreciate it? Thanks

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